Posts tagged Pope

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Valley priest: Pope Francis bringing Catholics back to church

Bob McClay, reporting for 92.3 KTAR:

PHOENIX — It’s been one year since Pope Francis took his position as head of the Catholic Church and a Valley priest said that he has seen an uptick in Catholics returning to the church.

Father John Muir of St. Rose Philippine Duchesne Church in Anthem was among the thousands of people who were in St. Peter’s Square when Pope Francis first appeared on the balcony. Muir said that Francis has made Catholics more excited about their faith.

"Pope Francis is such a powerful symbolic figure," he said. "He’s really encouraged Catholics to get back to basics and to not worry about what’s not really essential to who we are as Catholics. I think he’s also encouraged us to follow his example of being someone who takes their faith seriously and puts it into practice."

Muir said, since Francis became Pope, there’s more people in the pews at his church.

"We’ve seen probably a 30 to 40 percent increase in people coming to masses," he said. "Many of these are Catholics who were not that energetic or excited about their faith. They seem to be catching this ‘Pope Francis Fire.’"

Muir said some have been reassessing the priorities of the Catholic religion in their lives.

Muir said he’s also seeing members of his church starting to do more volunteer work in their community.

For Pope Francis, A Year of Reform and Evangelization

Francis X. Rocca, writing for Catholic News Service:

With his affable, informal manner and simple language, Pope Francis has focused on a message of mercy, forgiveness and concern for the poor. He has taken largely for granted those elements of church teaching, including sexual and medical ethics, that contemporary culture tends to reject as censorious and intolerant. He has thus elicited extraordinary levels of curiosity and good will far beyond the ranks of practicing Catholics around the world.

At the same time, the pope has carried out an all-but-explicit electoral mandate to reform the Vatican bureaucracy. A major topic of discussion at the cardinals’ meetings before the March 2013 papal conclave was the previous year’s controversy over published revelations of corruption and incompetence in the Roman Curia and Vatican City State.

Do Not be Afraid to go to Confession!
At Wednesday’s general audience, Pope Francis invited us all to reflect on the sacrament of confession, including how long it has been since we last confessed our sins.

If a lot of time has passed, don’t lose even one more day. Go! - Pope Francis

Though we walk into the confessional with a heavy heart, forgiveness brings freedom and joy!

Sometimes when you’re in line for confession, you feel all sorts of things, especially shame, but when your confession is over, you’ll leave free, great, beautiful, forgiven, clean, happy; this is what’s beautiful about confession. - Pope Francis

Read more via The Catholic Sun here!

Do Not be Afraid to go to Confession!

At Wednesday’s general audience, Pope Francis invited us all to reflect on the sacrament of confession, including how long it has been since we last confessed our sins.

If a lot of time has passed, don’t lose even one more day. Go! - Pope Francis

Though we walk into the confessional with a heavy heart, forgiveness brings freedom and joy!

Sometimes when you’re in line for confession, you feel all sorts of things, especially shame, but when your confession is over, you’ll leave free, great, beautiful, forgiven, clean, happy; this is what’s beautiful about confession. - Pope Francis

Read more via The Catholic Sun here!

Do not be afraid. Open wide the doors to Christ.
Homily of Bl. Pope John Paul II on the Inauguration of his Pontificate (from the Office of Readings)
Peter came to Rome! What else but obedience to the inspiration received from the Lord could have guided him and brought him to this city, the heart of the Empire? Perhaps the fisherman of Galilee did not want to come here. Perhaps he would have preferred to stay there, on the shores of Lake of Genesareth, with his boat and his nets. Yet guided by the Lord, obedient to his inspiration, he came here!
According to an ancient tradition, Peter tried to leave Rome during Nero’s persecution. However, the Lord intervened and came to meet him. Peter spoke to him and asked. “Quo vadis, Domine?” — “Where are you going, Lord?” And the Lord answered him at once: “I am going to Rome to be crucified again.” Peter went back to Rome and stayed here until his crucifixion.

Our time calls us, urges us, obliges us, to gaze on the Lord and to immerse ourselves in humble and devout meditation on the mystery of the supreme power of Christ himself.

He who was born of the Virgin Mary, the carpenter’s Son (as he was thought to be), the Son of the living God (as confessed by Peter), came to make us all “a kingdom of priests”.
The Second Vatican Council has reminded us of the mystery of this power and of the fact that Christ’s mission as Priest, Prophet-Teacher and King continues in the Church. Everyone, the whole People of God, shares in this threefold mission. Perhaps in the past the tiara, that triple crown, was placed on the Pope’s head in order to signify by that symbol the Lord’s plan for his Church, namely that all the hierarchical order of Christ’s Church, all “sacred power” exercised in the Church, is nothing other than service, service with a single purpose: to ensure that the whole People of God shares in this threefold mission of Christ and always remains under the power of the Lord; a power that has its source not in the powers of this world, but instead in the mystery of the Cross and the Resurrection.
The absolute, and yet sweet and gentle, power of the Lord responds to the whole depths of the human person, to his loftiest aspirations of intellect, will and heart. It does not speak the language of force, but expresses itself in charity and truth.
The new Successor of Peter in the See of Rome today makes a fervent, humble and trusting prayer: Christ, make me become and remain the servant of your unique power, the servant of your sweet power, the servant of your power that knows no dusk. Make me a servant: indeed, the servant of your servants.
Brothers and sisters, do not be afraid to welcome Christ and accept his power. Help the Pope and all those who wish to serve Christ and with Christ’s power to serve the human person and the whole of mankind.
Do not be afraid. Open, I say open wide the doors for Christ. To his saving power open the boundaries of states, economic and political systems, the vast fields of culture, civilization and development. Do not be afraid. Christ knows “that which is in man”. He alone knows it.
So often today, man does not know that which is in him, in the depths of his mind and heart. So often he is uncertain about the meaning of his life on this earth. He is assailed by doubt, a doubt which turns into despair. We ask you, therefore, we beg you with humility and with trust, let Christ speak to man. He alone has words of life, yes, of life eternal.

Do not be afraid. Open wide the doors to Christ.

Homily of Bl. Pope John Paul II on the Inauguration of his Pontificate (from the Office of Readings)

Peter came to Rome! What else but obedience to the inspiration received from the Lord could have guided him and brought him to this city, the heart of the Empire? Perhaps the fisherman of Galilee did not want to come here. Perhaps he would have preferred to stay there, on the shores of Lake of Genesareth, with his boat and his nets. Yet guided by the Lord, obedient to his inspiration, he came here!

According to an ancient tradition, Peter tried to leave Rome during Nero’s persecution. However, the Lord intervened and came to meet him. Peter spoke to him and asked. “Quo vadis, Domine?” — “Where are you going, Lord?” And the Lord answered him at once: “I am going to Rome to be crucified again.” Peter went back to Rome and stayed here until his crucifixion.

Our time calls us, urges us, obliges us, to gaze on the Lord and to immerse ourselves in humble and devout meditation on the mystery of the supreme power of Christ himself.

He who was born of the Virgin Mary, the carpenter’s Son (as he was thought to be), the Son of the living God (as confessed by Peter), came to make us all “a kingdom of priests”.

The Second Vatican Council has reminded us of the mystery of this power and of the fact that Christ’s mission as Priest, Prophet-Teacher and King continues in the Church. Everyone, the whole People of God, shares in this threefold mission. Perhaps in the past the tiara, that triple crown, was placed on the Pope’s head in order to signify by that symbol the Lord’s plan for his Church, namely that all the hierarchical order of Christ’s Church, all “sacred power” exercised in the Church, is nothing other than service, service with a single purpose: to ensure that the whole People of God shares in this threefold mission of Christ and always remains under the power of the Lord; a power that has its source not in the powers of this world, but instead in the mystery of the Cross and the Resurrection.

The absolute, and yet sweet and gentle, power of the Lord responds to the whole depths of the human person, to his loftiest aspirations of intellect, will and heart. It does not speak the language of force, but expresses itself in charity and truth.

The new Successor of Peter in the See of Rome today makes a fervent, humble and trusting prayer: Christ, make me become and remain the servant of your unique power, the servant of your sweet power, the servant of your power that knows no dusk. Make me a servant: indeed, the servant of your servants.

Brothers and sisters, do not be afraid to welcome Christ and accept his power. Help the Pope and all those who wish to serve Christ and with Christ’s power to serve the human person and the whole of mankind.

Do not be afraid. Open, I say open wide the doors for Christ. To his saving power open the boundaries of states, economic and political systems, the vast fields of culture, civilization and development. Do not be afraid. Christ knows “that which is in man”. He alone knows it.

So often today, man does not know that which is in him, in the depths of his mind and heart. So often he is uncertain about the meaning of his life on this earth. He is assailed by doubt, a doubt which turns into despair. We ask you, therefore, we beg you with humility and with trust, let Christ speak to man. He alone has words of life, yes, of life eternal.

Auxiliary Bishop Eduardo A. Nevares will be the first guest tonight on Horizonte, Eight’s weekly public affairs program which focuses on Arizona issues through a Hispanic lens.
Program host José Cárdenas and Bishop Nevares discuss Pope Francis and the upcoming Year of Faith pilgrimage to Mexico.
Tune in tonight at 7:30 p.m. on Eight, Arizona PBS.

Auxiliary Bishop Eduardo A. Nevares will be the first guest tonight on Horizonte, Eight’s weekly public affairs program which focuses on Arizona issues through a Hispanic lens.

Program host José Cárdenas and Bishop Nevares discuss Pope Francis and the upcoming Year of Faith pilgrimage to Mexico.

Tune in tonight at 7:30 p.m. on Eight, Arizona PBS.

Don’t miss The Catholic Sun’s 16-page special section devoted to our new Holy Father, Pope Francis. Lots of coverage and insights about the Argentine Cardinal-turned-pontiff, beautiful photos, and great local and international reaction conveying the excitement of the historic moment:



Fr. John Muir, assistant director at both the All Saints Catholic Newman Center in Tempe and the diocesan Office of Worship and Liturgy, was also in St. Peter’s Square. He blogged, Tweeted via social media and granted many media interviews about his experience.
“It’s winning the Super Bowl, combined with being a foster child and getting a new dad,” he wrote in a March 13 blogpost.



Read the story at The Catholic Sun. The special section featuring Pope Francis hits mailboxes this week.

Don’t miss The Catholic Sun’s 16-page special section devoted to our new Holy Father, Pope Francis. Lots of coverage and insights about the Argentine Cardinal-turned-pontiff, beautiful photos, and great local and international reaction conveying the excitement of the historic moment:

Fr. John Muir, assistant director at both the All Saints Catholic Newman Center in Tempe and the diocesan Office of Worship and Liturgy, was also in St. Peter’s Square. He blogged, Tweeted via social media and granted many media interviews about his experience.

“It’s winning the Super Bowl, combined with being a foster child and getting a new dad,” he wrote in a March 13 blogpost.

Read the story at The Catholic Sun. The special section featuring Pope Francis hits mailboxes this week.

‘Buona sera,’ Pope Francis

It was on that day, Wednesday March 13, when Catholics around the world rejoiced with an outpouring of love and praise for God. For as it goes, the College of Cardinals guided the Holy Spirit to elect the next leader of the world’s 1 billion Catholics. It was after just five ballots that the humble, gentle cardinal stepped out onto the balcony overlooking St. Peter’s Square as Pope Francis, greeting the world with the words: “Buona sera” — good evening.

And the crowd went crazy.

Phoenix area Catholics celebrate pope’s election

At St. Mary’s High School, faculty, students and parents rejoiced following the selection of the first Latin American pope.

“I’m so excited, I felt like a sheep without a shepherd,” said the Rev. Robert Bolding, president and rector of the central Phoenix school, where classroom activities were temporarily suspended to celebrate the announcement.

Classrooms with televisions were crammed with young men and women eager to catch a glimpse of the Catholic Church’s new leader.

“I’m really looking forward to what our new pope has to bring to Latin America and the rest of world,” said St. Mary’s junior Adriana Dealba.

“I’m sure he’ll do the best for the church,” student Hector Salinas said. “This is a new beginning; hopefully, he can bring peace to Latin America and the rest of the world.”

Diocese of Phoenix expert interviewed on KPHO CBS 5 about Pope Francis

Canon law expert Nicole Delaney was featured on KPHO CBS 5 News this morning and discussed yesterday’s election of Pope Francis and what it means for the Catholic Church.

Valley Catholics react to Pope Francis’ election

Mia Garcia, reporting for FOX 10 News:

Bishop Thomas J. Olmsted of the Catholic Diocese of Phoenix added, “What’s very significant for me about this new election is we have someone from what we call the new world, so America has a new Pope.”

Olmsted says he can’t wait to meet Pope Francis and says he can already tell a lot about the way the Pope will lead the church, by his name choice.

"I think it indicates that he really wants, like St. Francis, to bring a whole new energetic engagement with the world, including the non-Christian world."