Posts tagged Catholic

Catholic Schools on Despierta Arizona

Tune in to Despierta Arizona tomorrow at 8:24 a.m. on Channel 33!

Bishops Pray for Compassion, Community at Border
Cardinal Seán O’Malley and a dozen other bishops, including Bishop Gerald Kicanas of Tucson (pictured), gathered at the border this week to witness the plight of the immigrant.
See the Archdiocese of Boston’s photos here.
Read more via The Catholic Sun, and tune in to The Bishop’s Hour on Monday to hear how one parish in Phoenix is affected by the immigration debate.
(Photo credit: George Martell/The Pilot Media Group)

Bishops Pray for Compassion, Community at Border

Cardinal Seán O’Malley and a dozen other bishops, including Bishop Gerald Kicanas of Tucson (pictured), gathered at the border this week to witness the plight of the immigrant.

See the Archdiocese of Boston’s photos here.

Read more via The Catholic Sun, and tune in to The Bishop’s Hour on Monday to hear how one parish in Phoenix is affected by the immigration debate.

(Photo credit: George Martell/The Pilot Media Group)

The Mystery of Man’s Reconciliation with God
Pope St. Leo the Great from the Office of Readings
Lowliness is assured by majesty, weakness by power, mortality by eternity. To pay the debt of our sinful state, a nature that was incapable of suffering was joined to one that could suffer. Thus, in keeping with the healing that we needed, one and the same mediator between God and men, the man Jesus Christ, was able to die in one nature, and unable to die in the other.
He who is true God was therefore born in the complete and perfect nature of a true man, whole in his own nature, whole in ours. By our nature we mean what the Creator had fashioned in us from the beginning, and took to himself in order to restore it.
For in the Savior there was no trace of what the deceiver introduced and man, being misled, allowed to enter. It does not follow that because he submitted to sharing in our human weakness he therefore shared in our sins.
He took the nature of a servant without stain of sin, enlarging our humanity without diminishing his divinity. He emptied himself; though invisible he made himself visible, though Creator and Lord of all things he chose to be one of us mortal men. Yet this was the condescension of compassion, not the loss of omnipotence. So he who in the nature of God had created man, became in the nature of a servant, man himself.
Thus the Son of God enters this lowly world. He comes down from the throne of heaven, yet does not separate himself from the Father’s glory. He is born in a new condition, by a new birth.
He was born in a new condition, for, invisible in his own nature, he became visible in ours. Beyond our grasp, he chose to come within our grasp. Existing before time began, he began to exist at a moment in time. Lord of the universe, he hid his infinite glory and took the nature of a servant. Incapable of suffering as God, he did not refuse to be a man, capable of suffering. Immortal, he chose to be subject to the laws of death.
He who is true God is also true man. There is no falsehood in this unity as long as the lowliness of man and the pre-eminence of God coexist in mutual relationship.
As God does not change by his condescension, so man is not swallowed up by being exalted. Each nature exercises its own activity, in communion with the other. The Word does what is proper to the Word, the flesh fulfills what is proper to the flesh.
One nature is resplendent with miracles, the other falls victim to injuries. As the Word does not lose equality with the Father’s glory, so the flesh does not leave behind the nature of our race.
One and the same person — this must be said over and over again — is truly the Son of God and truly the son of man. He is God in virtue of the fact that in the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He is man in virtue of the fact that the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us.

The Mystery of Man’s Reconciliation with God

Pope St. Leo the Great from the Office of Readings

Lowliness is assured by majesty, weakness by power, mortality by eternity. To pay the debt of our sinful state, a nature that was incapable of suffering was joined to one that could suffer. Thus, in keeping with the healing that we needed, one and the same mediator between God and men, the man Jesus Christ, was able to die in one nature, and unable to die in the other.

He who is true God was therefore born in the complete and perfect nature of a true man, whole in his own nature, whole in ours. By our nature we mean what the Creator had fashioned in us from the beginning, and took to himself in order to restore it.

For in the Savior there was no trace of what the deceiver introduced and man, being misled, allowed to enter. It does not follow that because he submitted to sharing in our human weakness he therefore shared in our sins.

He took the nature of a servant without stain of sin, enlarging our humanity without diminishing his divinity. He emptied himself; though invisible he made himself visible, though Creator and Lord of all things he chose to be one of us mortal men. Yet this was the condescension of compassion, not the loss of omnipotence. So he who in the nature of God had created man, became in the nature of a servant, man himself.

Thus the Son of God enters this lowly world. He comes down from the throne of heaven, yet does not separate himself from the Father’s glory. He is born in a new condition, by a new birth.

He was born in a new condition, for, invisible in his own nature, he became visible in ours. Beyond our grasp, he chose to come within our grasp. Existing before time began, he began to exist at a moment in time. Lord of the universe, he hid his infinite glory and took the nature of a servant. Incapable of suffering as God, he did not refuse to be a man, capable of suffering. Immortal, he chose to be subject to the laws of death.

He who is true God is also true man. There is no falsehood in this unity as long as the lowliness of man and the pre-eminence of God coexist in mutual relationship.

As God does not change by his condescension, so man is not swallowed up by being exalted. Each nature exercises its own activity, in communion with the other. The Word does what is proper to the Word, the flesh fulfills what is proper to the flesh.

One nature is resplendent with miracles, the other falls victim to injuries. As the Word does not lose equality with the Father’s glory, so the flesh does not leave behind the nature of our race.

One and the same person — this must be said over and over again — is truly the Son of God and truly the son of man. He is God in virtue of the fact that in the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. He is man in virtue of the fact that the Word was made flesh, and dwelt among us.

The Way of St. James
Young adults from St. Anne’s Parish in Gilbert are preparing for the walk of a lifetime, and you are invited to participate. The group, led by Fr. Sergio M. Fita, Pastor of St. Anne’s, is funding a documentary to be filmed during their journey. 
The Camino de Santiago has been highlighted in the secular media in recent years, but the pilgrim route itself has been in use by Catholics for centuries. At minimum, please keep these pilgrims in your prayers!

I guess I’m just trying to listen to God’s voice more than anything, and figure out what it is He wants from me in this life.

Learn more about the pilgrimage and the documentary here, and don’t miss the article from The Catholic Sun.

The Way of St. James

Young adults from St. Anne’s Parish in Gilbert are preparing for the walk of a lifetime, and you are invited to participate. The group, led by Fr. Sergio M. Fita, Pastor of St. Anne’s, is funding a documentary to be filmed during their journey. 

The Camino de Santiago has been highlighted in the secular media in recent years, but the pilgrim route itself has been in use by Catholics for centuries. At minimum, please keep these pilgrims in your prayers!

I guess I’m just trying to listen to God’s voice more than anything, and figure out what it is He wants from me in this life.

Learn more about the pilgrimage and the documentary here, and don’t miss the article from The Catholic Sun.

The Lorica of St. PatrickFaeth Fiada
I arise todayThrough a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,Through a belief in the Threeness,Through confession of the Oneness Of the Creator of creation. 
I arise today Through the strength of Christ’s birth and His baptism,Through the strength of His crucifixion and His burial, Through the strength of His resurrection and His ascension,Through the strength of His descent for the judgment of doom.
I arise todayThrough the strength of the love of cherubim,In obedience of angels,In service of archangels,In the hope of resurrection to meet with reward,In the prayers of patriarchs, In preachings of the apostles,In faiths of confessors,In innocence of virgins,In deeds of righteous men. 
I arise todayThrough the strength of heaven; Light of the sun,Splendor of fire,Speed of lightning,Swiftness of the wind,Depth of the sea, Stability of the earth,Firmness of the rock. 
I arise todayThrough God’s strength to pilot me;God’s might to uphold me, God’s wisdom to guide me, God’s eye to look before me, God’s ear to hear me, God’s word to speak for me, God’s hand to guard me, God’s way to lie before me, God’s shield to protect me, God’s hosts to save me From snares of the devil, From temptations of vices, From every one who desires me ill, Afar and anear, Alone or in a mulitude. 
I summon today all these powers between me and evil,Against every cruel merciless power that opposes my body and soul, Against incantations of false prophets,Against black laws of pagandom,Against false laws of heretics,Against craft of idolatry, Against spells of women and smiths and wizards,Against every knowledge that corrupts man’s body and soul. Christ shield me today Against poison, against burning, Against drowning, against wounding,So that reward may come to me in abundance.

Christ with me, Christ before me, Christ behind me,Christ in me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me, Christ on my right, Christ on my left, Christ when I lie down, Christ when I sit down, Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me, Christ in the mouth of every man who speaks of me, Christ in the eye that sees me, Christ in the ear that hears me. 

I arise todayThrough a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,Through a belief in the Threeness,Through a confession of the OnenessOf the Creator of creation.

The Lorica of St. Patrick
Faeth Fiada

I arise today
Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,
Through a belief in the Threeness,
Through confession of the Oneness 
Of the Creator of creation. 

I arise today 
Through the strength of Christ’s birth and His baptism,
Through the strength of His crucifixion and His burial, 
Through the strength of His resurrection and His ascension,
Through the strength of His descent for the judgment of doom.

I arise today
Through the strength of the love of cherubim,
In obedience of angels,
In service of archangels,
In the hope of resurrection to meet with reward,
In the prayers of patriarchs, 
In preachings of the apostles,
In faiths of confessors,
In innocence of virgins,
In deeds of righteous men. 

I arise today
Through the strength of heaven; 
Light of the sun,
Splendor of fire,
Speed of lightning,
Swiftness of the wind,
Depth of the sea, 
Stability of the earth,
Firmness of the rock. 

I arise today
Through God’s strength to pilot me;
God’s might to uphold me, 
God’s wisdom to guide me, 
God’s eye to look before me, 
God’s ear to hear me, 
God’s word to speak for me, 
God’s hand to guard me, 
God’s way to lie before me, 
God’s shield to protect me, 
God’s hosts to save me 
From snares of the devil, 
From temptations of vices, 
From every one who desires me ill, 
Afar and anear, 
Alone or in a mulitude. 

I summon today all these powers between me and evil,
Against every cruel merciless power that opposes my body and soul, 
Against incantations of false prophets,
Against black laws of pagandom,
Against false laws of heretics,
Against craft of idolatry, 
Against spells of women and smiths and wizards,
Against every knowledge that corrupts man’s body and soul. 
Christ shield me today 
Against poison, against burning, 
Against drowning, against wounding,
So that reward may come to me in abundance.

Christ with me, Christ before me, Christ behind me,
Christ in me, Christ beneath me, Christ above me, 
Christ on my right, Christ on my left, 
Christ when I lie down, Christ when I sit down, 
Christ in the heart of every man who thinks of me, 
Christ in the mouth of every man who speaks of me, 
Christ in the eye that sees me, 
Christ in the ear that hears me. 

I arise today
Through a mighty strength, the invocation of the Trinity,
Through a belief in the Threeness,
Through a confession of the Oneness
Of the Creator of creation.

For Pope Francis, A Year of Reform and Evangelization

Francis X. Rocca, writing for Catholic News Service:

With his affable, informal manner and simple language, Pope Francis has focused on a message of mercy, forgiveness and concern for the poor. He has taken largely for granted those elements of church teaching, including sexual and medical ethics, that contemporary culture tends to reject as censorious and intolerant. He has thus elicited extraordinary levels of curiosity and good will far beyond the ranks of practicing Catholics around the world.

At the same time, the pope has carried out an all-but-explicit electoral mandate to reform the Vatican bureaucracy. A major topic of discussion at the cardinals’ meetings before the March 2013 papal conclave was the previous year’s controversy over published revelations of corruption and incompetence in the Roman Curia and Vatican City State.

Do Not be Afraid to go to Confession!
At Wednesday’s general audience, Pope Francis invited us all to reflect on the sacrament of confession, including how long it has been since we last confessed our sins.

If a lot of time has passed, don’t lose even one more day. Go! - Pope Francis

Though we walk into the confessional with a heavy heart, forgiveness brings freedom and joy!

Sometimes when you’re in line for confession, you feel all sorts of things, especially shame, but when your confession is over, you’ll leave free, great, beautiful, forgiven, clean, happy; this is what’s beautiful about confession. - Pope Francis

Read more via The Catholic Sun here!

Do Not be Afraid to go to Confession!

At Wednesday’s general audience, Pope Francis invited us all to reflect on the sacrament of confession, including how long it has been since we last confessed our sins.

If a lot of time has passed, don’t lose even one more day. Go! - Pope Francis

Though we walk into the confessional with a heavy heart, forgiveness brings freedom and joy!

Sometimes when you’re in line for confession, you feel all sorts of things, especially shame, but when your confession is over, you’ll leave free, great, beautiful, forgiven, clean, happy; this is what’s beautiful about confession. - Pope Francis

Read more via The Catholic Sun here!

Challenging the Cultural Divide: Pope Francis Series on the Church and Society
The Diocese of Phoenix and Catholic Phoenix invite you to attend the second presentation in the Pope Francis Speaker Series on the Church and Society: Challenging the Cultural Divide featuring Dr. Paige Hochschild, Assistant Professor of Theology at Mount Saint Mary’s University on Friday, February 28th.  
If you have a family, hope to have a family, work with families, or are part of a family, you don’t want to miss this presentation! Examine societal issues from a Catholic perspective with Dr. Hochschild, who will address historical problems unique to the American situation, how the family is a point of intersection for the Church and the world, Gaudium et Spes’ vision of family as promoter of the common good, and how some Catholic approaches to marriage over-privatize the family.

Hear Dr. Hochschild on The Bishop’s Hour discussing St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas here!

The talk will begin at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, February 28, at Xavier College Preparatory Performing Arts Center, 4710 N 5th St., Phoenix. The cost is $10 for adults, $5 for full-time students with ID, and free for priests and religious. There will be a reception following the talk, Dr. Hochschild will take questions, giving attendees an opportunity to discuss what they heard.  
To purchase tickets or for more information, visit diocesephoenix.org/PopeFrancisSpeakers.   

Challenging the Cultural Divide: Pope Francis Series on the Church and Society

The Diocese of Phoenix and Catholic Phoenix invite you to attend the second presentation in the Pope Francis Speaker Series on the Church and Society: Challenging the Cultural Divide featuring Dr. Paige Hochschild, Assistant Professor of Theology at Mount Saint Mary’s University on Friday, February 28th.  

If you have a family, hope to have a family, work with families, or are part of a family, you don’t want to miss this presentation! Examine societal issues from a Catholic perspective with Dr. Hochschild, who will address historical problems unique to the American situation, how the family is a point of intersection for the Church and the world, Gaudium et Spes’ vision of family as promoter of the common good, and how some Catholic approaches to marriage over-privatize the family.

Hear Dr. Hochschild on The Bishop’s Hour discussing St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas here!

The talk will begin at 7:00 p.m. on Friday, February 28, at Xavier College Preparatory Performing Arts Center, 4710 N 5th St., Phoenix. The cost is $10 for adults, $5 for full-time students with ID, and free for priests and religious. There will be a reception following the talk, Dr. Hochschild will take questions, giving attendees an opportunity to discuss what they heard.  

To purchase tickets or for more information, visit diocesephoenix.org/PopeFrancisSpeakers.   

The Cross Exemplifies Every Virtue
St. Thomas Aquinas from the Office of Readings
Why did the Son of God have to suffer for us? There was a great need, and it can be considered in a twofold way: in the first place, as a remedy for sin, and secondly, as an example of how to act.
It is a remedy, for, in the face of all the evils which we incur on account of our sins, we have found relief through the passion of Christ. Yet, it is no less an example, for the passion of Christ completely suffices to fashion our lives. Whoever wishes to live perfectly should do nothing but disdain what Christ disdained on the cross and desire what he desired, for the cross exemplifies every virtue.
If you seek the example of love: Greater love than this no man has, than to lay down his life for his friends. Such a man was Christ on the cross. And if he gave his life for us, then it should not be difficult to bear whatever hardships arise for his sake.
If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways: either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid. Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten; he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth. Therefore Christ’s patience on the cross was great. In patience let us run for the prize set before us, looking upon Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith who, for the joy set before him, bore his cross and despised the shame.
If you seek an example of humility, look upon the crucified one, for God wished to be judged by Pontius Pilate and to die.
If you seek an example of obedience, follow him who became obedient to the Father even unto death. For just as by the disobedience of one man, namely, Adam, many were made sinners, so by the obedience of one man, many were made righteous.
If you seek an example of despising earthly things, follow him who is the King of kings and the Lord of lords, in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. Upon the cross he was stripped, mocked, spat upon, struck, crowned with thorns, and given only vinegar and gall to drink.
Do not be attached, therefore, to clothing and riches, because they divided my garments among themselves. Nor to honors, for he experienced harsh words and scourgings. Nor to greatness of rank, for weaving a crown of thorns they placed it on my head. Nor to anything delightful, for in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink.

The Cross Exemplifies Every Virtue

St. Thomas Aquinas from the Office of Readings

Why did the Son of God have to suffer for us? There was a great need, and it can be considered in a twofold way: in the first place, as a remedy for sin, and secondly, as an example of how to act.

It is a remedy, for, in the face of all the evils which we incur on account of our sins, we have found relief through the passion of Christ. Yet, it is no less an example, for the passion of Christ completely suffices to fashion our lives. Whoever wishes to live perfectly should do nothing but disdain what Christ disdained on the cross and desire what he desired, for the cross exemplifies every virtue.

If you seek the example of love: Greater love than this no man has, than to lay down his life for his friends. Such a man was Christ on the cross. And if he gave his life for us, then it should not be difficult to bear whatever hardships arise for his sake.

If you seek patience, you will find no better example than the cross. Great patience occurs in two ways: either when one patiently suffers much, or when one suffers things which one is able to avoid and yet does not avoid. Christ endured much on the cross, and did so patiently, because when he suffered he did not threaten; he was led like a sheep to the slaughter and he did not open his mouth. Therefore Christ’s patience on the cross was great. In patience let us run for the prize set before us, looking upon Jesus, the author and perfecter of our faith who, for the joy set before him, bore his cross and despised the shame.

If you seek an example of humility, look upon the crucified one, for God wished to be judged by Pontius Pilate and to die.

If you seek an example of obedience, follow him who became obedient to the Father even unto death. For just as by the disobedience of one man, namely, Adam, many were made sinners, so by the obedience of one man, many were made righteous.

If you seek an example of despising earthly things, follow him who is the King of kings and the Lord of lords, in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. Upon the cross he was stripped, mocked, spat upon, struck, crowned with thorns, and given only vinegar and gall to drink.

Do not be attached, therefore, to clothing and riches, because they divided my garments among themselves. Nor to honors, for he experienced harsh words and scourgings. Nor to greatness of rank, for weaving a crown of thorns they placed it on my head. Nor to anything delightful, for in my thirst they gave me vinegar to drink.